Seamless
Effortless group ordering
PROCESS
RESEARCH
Scenario
Competitive
Analysis
Interviews
RESEARCH
SYNTHESIZE
IDEATION
DESIGN
FEEDBACK
CONCLUSION
Problem Statement
Interviews
Scenario
Competitive Analysis
Low Fidelity Wireframes
Testing
What I Learned
User Persona
Journey Map
High Fidelity Wireframes
Interactive Prototypes
Use Cases
SYNTHESIZE
Problem Statement
Use Cases
IDEATION
User Personas
Journey Map
Seamless is a food ordering service that solely services New York under national brand, Grubhub.  With many competitors amongst them, Seamless makes ordering food to offices or homes exactly what the name suggests, seamless.

When working in Manhattan, I found myself using Seamless more frequently than other competitors for three reasons:
Ordering Experience

From searching for food to having it delivered, Seamless does a great job at making the journey easy for the user. All of the menu options are laid out and easily accessible.
Free Delivery Promotions

I’m constantly receiving offers for free delivery or discounted delivery which helps me feel less guilty than walking an avenue to get food myself.
Familiarity Among Co-workers

A lot of my co-workers (who have worked in Manhattan much longer than I have) always suggested Seamless over others.  It was treated as if it was the only option for ordering food.
With long work hours and busy commutes, New Yorkers need a great app to keep themselves fed and full of energy. While Seamless is easy and convenient to use, I keep thinking to myself how it could be better. That thought led to this project.
I interviewed six different people who state that they regularly use Seamless (3+ times per week) to order food to their work office or home. I asked questions about their orders, the experience they go through to collaborate on group orders at work and the service they receive in regards to delivery times as well as accuracy of order.
Interviews
While users are happy with the streamlined ordering process, accuracy of ordering and overall experience that Seamless delivers I noticed an interesting scenario that happened frequently with group ordering.
Nick is hungry at work so he texts his creative team and asks if they’re interested in ordering lunch on Seamless
Scenario
Above is a common scenario that plays out almost every single time when a group of people order food together. However, there are several glaring problems with this that must be addressed:
Problem
1.  It ends up being a lot of effort to place a single order for the same address
2.  Users still need to send money to the person who ordered after they go through the process
3.  Order is placed by the person who volunteers to do so
The person who ordered needs to go back and find out how much each person owes for the order as well as collect the money through a different application.
Users have to decide on a restaurant, Google the menu, tell the person ordering they want and then send them money to cover the order.
It wouldn’t make sense to order for the same address multiple times at the same time of day.
Competitive Analysis
After looking at similar experiences with UberEats and Postmates, the common issues is:

Seamless, UberEats and other services cater to individuals, not groups.
Problem Statement
Seamless does not offer a platform that caters to the needs of groups of people who would like to order food to the same adress.
Use Cases
User Personas
I created a user persona to represent my six interviewees. They all possess qualities of being hard working, passionate about their jobs and time poor. I’m going to use this persona to hone in on what the user needs and wants in order to revamp Seamless.
Journey Map
I created a journey map that showed both users going through the process at the same time. I felt this was the best way to show what steps the orderer goes through as well as the second (third or fourth) person goes through while being apart of a group order. This map is intended to give a clearer view to the scenario shown above as well as point out any missed pain points.
The group decides on a Mexican restaurant and Google the menu to give Dan their order
Dos Toros Menu
Dan adds of the items to the car and orders via Seamless
“Whenever I go to order, I always ask my roommates if they want anything”
“My co-workers and I always order lunch for our team”
Nick and Sabrina send money to Dan to pay for their order
Order regularly with co-workers
or friends
Use food delivery ordered to their office
Use Seamless exclusively compared to competitors
5 in 6
6 in 6
4 in 6
A number of pain points were revealed through this process, most notably the switching between multiple apps to finally place a group order. This journey map will be a good way to figure out how to best save customers time as well as mitigate the number of steps it takes to accomplish a streamlined group order.
High Fidelity
Wireframes
Interactive
Prototypes
Low Fidelity
Wireframes
DESIGN
Low-Fidelity wireframes exploring how to incorporate finding friends for a group order
CONCLUSION
Creating this feature for Seamless was a ton of fun and I still can’t believe this isn’t a real function yet! I’m happy with my choice to incorporate the “Group Order” button where I did because a lot of times single orders can turn into group orders at the last minute. Due to this, I didn’t think it was a good idea to have it be determined prior to the first user ordering anything at all.

For the sake of everyone in New York, I hope Seamless adds this feature and enhances the way New York eats.
FEEDBACK
I reached back out to the six people I had interviewed and showed them my high fidelity wireframes and sent them a link to the prototype. I wanted to get their opinions on how functional this new feature looks and feels as well as their ability to place a group order. InVision prototypes are sort of flawed in a way where they mitigate room for error. With that being said, they all had no issues using the prototype and felt like it was an easy to understand and learn feature.

I went one step further and gave the prototype to my Mom. She’s never used a food ordering app before and prior to this, she’s never seen Seamless. With only one task given, she was easily able to select friends and place the group order.
I reached back out to the six people I had interviewed and showed them my high fidelity wireframes and sent them a link to the prototype. I wanted to get their opinions on how functional this new feature looks and feels as well as their ability to place a group order. InVision prototypes are sort of flawed in a way where they mitigate room for error. With that being said, they all had no issues using the prototype and felt like it was an easy to understand and learn feature.

I went one step further and gave the prototype to my Mom. She’s never used a food ordering app before and prior to this, she’s never seen Seamless. With only one task given, she was easily able to select friends and place the group order.
DANIEL HASSELL
Return to Home
Multidisciplinary Designer & Art Director
DANIEL HASSELL
Seamless
Effortless group ordering
Seamless is a food ordering service that solely services New York under national brand, Grubhub.  With many competitors amongst them, Seamless makes ordering food to offices or homes exactly what the name suggests, seamless.

When working in Manhattan, I found myself using Seamless more frequently than other competitors for three reasons:
Ordering Experience

From searching for food to having it delivered, Seamless does a great job at making the journey easy for the user. All of the menu options are laid out and easily accessible.
Free Delivery Promotions

I’m constantly receiving offers for free delivery or discounted delivery which helps me feel less guilty than walking an avenue to get food myself.
Familiarity Among Co-workers

A lot of my co-workers (who have worked in Manhattan much longer than I have) always suggested Seamless over others.  It was treated as if it was the only option for ordering food.
With long work hours and busy commutes, New Yorkers need a great app to keep themselves fed and full of energy. While Seamless is easy and convenient to use,
I keep thinking to myself how it could be better. That thought led to this project.
PROCESS
RESEARCH
SYNTHESIZE
IDEATION
DESIGN
FEEDBACK
CONCLUSION
RESEARCH
I interviewed six different people who state that they regularly use Seamless (3+ times per week) to order food to their work office or home. I asked questions about their orders, the experience they go through to collaborate on group orders at work and the service they receive in regards to delivery times as well as accuracy of order.
Interviews
Order regularly with co-workers
or friends
5 in 6
Use food delivery ordered to their office
6 in 6
Use Seamless exclusively compared to competitors
4 in 6
While users are happy with the streamlined ordering process, accuracy of ordering and overall experience that Seamless delivers, I noticed an interesting scenario that happened frequently with group ordering.
Scenario
Nick is hungry at work so he texts his creative team and asks if they’re interested in ordering lunch on Seamless
Dos Toros Menu
The group decides on a Mexican restaurant and Google the menu to give Dan their order
Dan adds of the items to the car and orders via Seamless
Nick and Sabrina send money to Dan to pay for their order
Above is a common scenario that plays out almost every single time when a group of people order food together. However, there are several glaring problems with this that must be addressed:
Problem
1.  It ends up being a lot of effort to place a single order for the same address
Users have to decide on a restaurant, Google the menu, tell the person ordering they want and then send them money to cover the order.
2.  Users still need to send money to the person who ordered after they go through the process
The person who ordered needs to go back and find out how much each person owes for the order as well as collect the money through a different application.
3.  Order is placed by the person who volunteers to do so
It wouldn’t make sense to order for the same address multiple times at the same time of day.
Competitive Analysis
After looking at similar experiences with UberEats and Postmates, the common issues is:
Seamless, UberEats and other services cater to individuals, not groups.
SYNTHESIZE
Problem Statement
Seamless does not offer a platform that caters to the needs of groups of people who would like to order food to the same adress.
Use Cases
“Whenever I go to order, I always ask my roommates if they want anything”
“My co-workers and I always order lunch for our team”
IDEATION
User Personas
I created a user persona to represent my six interviewees. They all possess qualities of being hard working, passionate about their jobs and time poor. I’m going to use this persona to hone in on what the user needs and wants in order to revamp Seamless.
Journey Map
I created a journey map that showed both users going through the process at the same time. I felt this was the best way to show what steps the orderer goes through as well as the second (third or fourth) person goes through while being apart of a group order. This map is intended to give a clearer view to the scenario shown above as well as point out any missed pain points.
A number of pain points were revealed through this process, most notably the switching between multiple apps to finally place a group order. This journey map will be a good way to figure out how to best save customers time as well as mitigate the number of steps it takes to accomplish a streamlined group order.
DESIGN
Low-Fidelity wireframes exploring how to incorporate finding friends for a group order
Click Here to View an Interactive Prototype
(Works best on Desktop)
FEEDBACK
Return to Home
I reached back out to the six people I had interviewed and showed them my high fidelity wireframes and sent them a link to the prototype. I wanted to get their opinions on how functional this new feature looks and feels as well as their ability to place a group order. InVision prototypes are sort of flawed in a way where they mitigate room for error. With that being said, they all had no issues using the prototype and felt like it was an easy to understand and learn feature.

I went one step further and gave the prototype to my Mom. She’s never used a food ordering app before and prior to this, she’s never seen Seamless. With only one task given, she was easily able to select friends and place the group order.
CONCLUSION
Creating this feature for Seamless was a ton of fun and I still can’t believe this isn’t a real function yet! I’m happy with my choice to incorporate the “Group Order” button where I did because a lot of times single orders can turn into group orders at the last minute. Due to this, I didn’t think it was a good idea to have it be determined prior to the first user ordering anything at all.

For the sake of everyone in New York, I hope Seamless adds this feature and enhances the way New York eats.
Multidisciplinary Designer & Art Director